Karl Struss - West Street, New York City (1911)

Karl Struss – West Street, New York City (1911) – platinum print – 11x9cm

Karl Struss is essentially a 20th century photographer which is not obvious from these early examples of his work. He uses a very different approach diametrically opposed in color and focus to William Eggleston in the previous post. Yet his result is similar with a focus on detail and sense of reality. He successfully borrows from the impressionist painters the discovery or principle whereby breaking up the line and detail can create a greater sense of reality than slavishly trying to copy the scene in all it’s accurate line and light effects. (See post on Gustave Caillebotte.)

Another point illustrated by these two artists is that there can be no rules for art. One artist may work to a certain set of rules, and another artist use a set of rules completely opposed, yet both create equally valid and effective art.

Karl Struss - Herald Square, New York City (1911)

Karl Struss – Herald Square, New York City (1911) – platinum print – 9x11cm

Karl Struss - Manhattan Bridge (1910)

Karl Struss – Manhattan Bridge (1910) – platinum print – 10x11cm

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *